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The Terrestrial & Aquatic Conservation Lab

About Us

Welcome to John Reynolds' Terrestrial & Aquatic Conservation Lab, part of the Earth to Ocean Research Group at Simon Fraser University located on the west coast of British Columbia, Canada. We combine three core pillars of research, conservation, and training to help enhance both terrestrial and aquatic biodiversity in North America. Our studies range from links between life history traits of fish and their vulnerability to extinction, to impacts of nutrients from salmon on birds and plants, to large-scale studies of links between marine-derived nutrient subsidies and island biogeography.

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Our research at the interface between aquatic and terrestrial habitats involves extensive fieldwork along the beautiful central coast of British Columbia, much of which is in collaboration with our Heiltsuk First Nation hosts. The life cycles of Pacific salmon tie freshwater, marine and terrestrial habitats together, and our central coast work provides an opportunity to understand their ecosystem connections in an area where there has been long-term habitation by First Nations peoples, but no impacts from urbanization, large-scale logging, or pollution in streams.

Research

Conservation

While our research often has conservation implications, much of our impacts come through scientific advisory positions that Dr. John Reynolds has been involved with at various levels of government and with environmental organizations.  For example, he is the Chair of COSEWIC - the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, which advises the federal government on the status of plants and animals, for potential protection under the Species at Risk Act. He encourages all of his students and postdocs to translate their research into policy-relevant advice  for conservation and sustainability initiatives.

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Training

Training in our group ranges from teaching undergraduate courses to mentorship of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.  We place a strong emphasis on development of quantitative skills, publication in high-quality journals, and development of skills that will prepare people for fun and rewarding careers in ecology and conservation.

Funding

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